Pewaseskwan Team

The People at Pewaseskwan

Alex Smith

Alex Smith

Project Coordinator

Alex is from Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation in Treaty 5, near Thompson, Manitoba. A mother of two young boys who now calls Saskatoon home, she studied at USask to earn a BA in Anthropology and Indigenous Studies. She oversees the Miyo-pimâtisiwin and Recovery Lake projects. She brings several years of experience volunteering within the inner city, youth and vulnerable populations. Alex is grounded in the Seven Grandfather teachings she was raised with, including respect, wisdom, honesty, truth, bravery, love and humility, and brings these teachings to her work. When she is not working, Alex loves to be creative. She paints, beads and writes. She also loves spending time bonding and learning with her children, their dog, Sage, and their cat, Marley.
Arianna Berthold

Arianna Berthold

Research Assistant

Arianna, who works on the Hope Through Strength project, is a fourth-generation settler of German, Austrian and Latvian descent, whose ancestors farmed in Treaty 4 and Treaty 6 lands. She graduated from USask in 2020 with a Bachelor of Commerce and a BA in Psychology, and has worked in the non-profit sector, including in a position overseeing and monitoring federally funded housing projects in the city. She has a passion for research and a strong interest in promoting Indigenous self-determination and learning more about Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing.
Ashley Secundiak

Ashley Secundiak

Project Coordinator

Ashley works on several Pewaseskwan projects, including Mitewekan, CheckUp! and Kennedy’s Disease. She joined the team in July 2020 as a clerical assistant, but her talent for research was quickly apparent and she was soon promoted to a research associate. In August 2023, she was promoted to her current role. Ashley has a strong interest in patient-focused research and obtained her Bachelor of Science in Physiology and Pharmacology from USask. She is from the town of Sturgis, in Treaty 4 territory, but now calls Saskatoon and Treaty 6 territory home. When she is not working, She enjoys spending time in the sunshine, visiting with friends and family, and testing out new recipes in the kitchen.
Brennan (Bren) Thompson

Brennan (Bren) Thompson

Executive Director

Bren, a certified Project Management Professional, was born and raised on a wild boar farm near Maryfield, a village in southeast Saskatchewan, on Treaty 2 territory. She worked with the Sunrise Health Region in Yorkton as a member of the human resources team, beginning in 2009 on a temporary contract and then securing a permanent position, as well as a management position at a mechanical company in 2017. Bren moved to Saskatoon in May 2019 to join Pewaseskwan. Outside of work she enjoys reading historical fiction, going to the gym and walking her dogs along Saskatoon’s Meewasin Trails.
Carmen Ernst-Fiddler

Carmen Ernst-Fiddler

Research Officer

Carmen is a Métis woman registered with Western Region II in Prince Albert. She is the proud mother of Kayel, Harrison, Bostyn and Memphis. She works primarily with the Apihkatatan project. She is a graduate of the First Nations University of Canada (FNUC), where she earned a certificate, bachlor’s degree and master’s degree, all majoring in Indigenous Social Work. She also has certificates in youth care and expressive art therapy. She is now a PhD student in Indigenous Studies at USask. Carmen worked with youth for 15 years, first as a youth care leader and then as a case worker. She also worked as a corrections officer at Pine Grove Correctional Centre, the provincial prison for women in Prince Albert. In addition to being a student, she currently works as a mental health therapist and sessional instructor at FNUC. In her free time, Carmen enjoys painting, reading, going to the gym, travelling and attending her children’s activities. 

 

Carrielynn Lund

Carrielynn Lund

Project Coordinator

Carrielynn heads the Drum & Sash project. She is Métis from the Gift Lake Métis Settlement in northern Alberta but she now lives on Treaty 6 territory, and the traditional homeland of the Métis, in Edmonton with her husband. She is a Michif speaker and Elder in her community. She has worked in Indigenous health research for over 25 years. Her primary focus is assisting Indigenous communities to develop cultural responses to HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted blood-borne infections and related mental health and stigma. Her committee work includes service on the Aboriginal Healing Foundation (Treasurer), the CIHR Ethics Standing Committee and the Health Canada/Public Health Agency of Canada Research Ethics Board. She contributes substantially to the CIHR review and process development and is highly skilled working within network environments.Outside of work, Carrielynn, who is a mother and grandmother, spends as much time as possible with her children and grandchildren. She has a heart for seniors and, with her husband, serves and trains other volunteers to serve in long-term care facilities in Edmonton She and her husband are active members of their church.

 

Chelsie Collins

Chelsie Collins

Research Associate

Chelsie Collins is a woman from Sweetgrass First Nation on Treaty 6 territory. She is a graduate of Sanctum 1.5, a program that helps pregnant women who have or are at risk of HIV keep their babies from being apprehended, and she comes from lived experience. She believes that graduating from Sanctum 1.5 changed her life forever, and since then, she has become a part of the research space where she learns and makes valuable contributions. c. Over time, she has gained skills in research design, data collection and has earned TCPS2 Core on Research Ethics Certification. She leads interviews for data collection, and in August 2023, she presented at the Indigenous Development Origins of Health and Diseases Conference. She is also involved in community research with the Waniska Indigenous Centre for HIV/HCV/STBBI research. She is a mother and grandmother and in her free time, she enjoys playing bingo and going out with her family and spending time with them.

Dakota (Koda) Sinclair

Dakota (Koda) Sinclair

Waniska Community Coordinator (SK)

Koda, also known as Pipikwân-Iskwew (Eagle Whistle Woman), is Nehiyawak (Plains Cree) from Poundmaker Cree Nation in Treaty 6 territory. She grew up on her reserve and has a strong connection to its people, culture and land. She moved to Saskatoon in 2013 to attend university and graduated with a BA in Sociology in 2018. She has worked extensively with non-profit organizations in Saskatoon, including as a youth care worker, an outreach worker and as a family literacy facilitator. Koda’s long-term goal is to study law. Outside of work she enjoys reading, going for walks and hanging out with friends. She is also involved in ceremony, participating in sweats, round dances, powwows, Horse Dances and Sundances.
Elgun Mehdiyev

Elgun Mehdiyev

Clerical Assistant

Elgun Mehdiyev was born and raised in Azerbaijan, a county in western Asia. He and his wife and daughter recently moved to Saskatoon from Vancouver. Elgun studied International Relations at the University of Baku, in the Azerbaijani capital, earning both a BA and an MA. He has worked as an executive assistant for a company in Vancouver and at the Consulate General of Azerbaijan in Los Angelos, where he lived from 2017 to 2021. He has a strong communication skills, technical skills, teamwork, organizational skills and problem-solving skills. When Elgun is not working, he has a strong love of reading, particularly classic literature, history, politics and international affairs. He also takes great pleasure in spending quality time with his family. 

Emily Bear

Emily Bear

Indigenous Cultural Facilitator

Emily is Nehiyawak (Plains Cree) from Beardy’s and Okemasis First Nation in Treaty 6 territory. She grew up in Rosthern and Saskatoon. She has both a diploma in Mental Health and Wellness and an Educational Assistant certificate from the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT) and brings years of experience in counselling and cultural programming. She has worked at the Métis Addictions Council of Saskatoon Inc. (MACSI) as a counsellor and program manager and ran the Sisters Strengthening Sisters program at the Saskatoon Indian and Métis Friendship Centre. In 2010 she founded the youth organization Reaching Back Moving Forward, which connected Indigenous youth with Elders. Emily has lived experience of intergenerational trauma, substance use and gang life; she turned her life around through ceremony, and now participates in sweats, Sundances and powwow, and is active sharing her cultural knowledge. Emily is the mother of three children and is also raising a grandniece and a nephew. She loves to bead and sew her family’s powwow regalia and ribbons skirts.
Holly McKenzie

Holly McKenzie

Postdoctoral Fellow

Holly works with Pewaseskwan on the Hope Through Strength project at Sanctum 1.5. She has a PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies from UBC and was previously a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at USask in the One Health and Wellness Office. During that time, she explored how therapy dog-handler teams with St. John’s Ambulance can further support people dealing with concerns related to substance use and/or mental health. She has experience engaging qualitative, quantitative and Indigenous methodologies in partnership with Indigenous communities dating back to 2007. She is working with the Hope Through Strength team to adapt and apply a Social Return on Investment framework for Sanctum 1.5’s context through Indigenous and etuaptmumk (Two-eyed Seeing) approaches. She grew up on a farm near a hamlet in the rural municipality of Lomond in Treaty 4 territory and the Homeland of the Métis, but now lives in Saskatoon. To learn more about Holly’s previous research visit her website.
José Diego Marques Santos

José Diego Marques Santos

Research Associate

José Diego Marques Santos (Diego) is a research associate with the Sanctum 1.5 Hope Through Strength project. Diego is from the State of Piauí, Brazil and is of mixed ancestry, including Indigenous, Black and Portuguese. He lives in Leoville, SK, in Treaty 6 territory with his partner Cole. He has a Bachelor of Nursing from the Federal University of Piauí and an MSc in Community and Population Health from USask. Diego has worked as a researcher with the Saskatchewan Health Authority and at USask in the College of Medicine, the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology. He has experience with administrative databases, data analysis, patient oriented research and manuscript writing. When he isn’t working, Diego enjoys dog walking, even though he doesn’t have a dog of his own, binging Netflix and playing video games. He and Cole have also recently developed an interest in plants and have started to fill their home with plant “daughters.”

Kehinde Ametepee

Kehinde Ametepee

Research Manager

Kehinde is a Ghanaian-Canadian physician who was born and raised in Nigeria. He holds a Master of Public Health from Simon Fraser University. His training, combined with five years of clinical experience before moving to Canada, makes him well grounded in the biomedical, clinical, socio-political, and economic aspects of health. Kehinde’s areas of research interests broadly include community based-participatory research etuaptmumk (Two-eyed Seeing) methodologies, and health inequities involving key populations such as Indigenous communities, African, Caribbean and Black populations, and new Canadians. He is particularly interested in exploring innovative approaches to improving testing, diagnosis, and linkage-to-care regarding HIV, hepatitis C and other sexually transmissible and blood-borne infections in these populations. His current work with Pewaseskwan involves providing support to teams of community researchers in all phases of research projects from agenda development through project implementation, including on the CheckUp!, IPERC, VCCC and Kennedy’s Disease projects. He is married and has a daughter and a son. He enjoys spending time with his family and watching sports.
Keira Anderson

Keira Anderson

Administrative Assistant

She is a white settler who was born and raised in Treaty 6 territory in Saskatoon. Keira earned a BSc. in Applied Animal Biology from the University of British Columbia in 2021 and has worked for nearly seven years as a veterinary assistant. She has completed an MBA from USask in the fall of 2023. She hopes to use her experience and education to help Indigenous communities improve their economic health as well as their physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. She also hopes to learn more about Indigenization processes and how they can be applied to business, too. When she is not working or studying, Keira enjoys biking, reading and spending time with friends.   

 

Kenlei Cowell

Kenlei Cowell

Community Outreach Specialist

Kenlei is an American of mixed settler and Anishnabe ancestry. They are a member of the Sault Ste Marie Tribe of Ojibwe in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. They grew up in several places in the American Midwest, but consider Milwaukee, Wisconsin home. They moved to Saskatoon in 2023. Kenlei has a BA in Journalism and Public Relations, with a minor in Mandarin from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and is currently taking an MSW in Indigenous Trauma and Resiliency through the University of Toronto. They have professional experience in communications, program administration, content creation, research and creative design, acquired through jobs in the Mediterranean, India, Taiwan and most recently in Eugene, Oregon, where they worked at the University of Oregon and with a non-profit organization. Outside of work and school, Kenlei has two cats and two dogs and they are an avid crafter. They love crocheting, beading and book-binding. They also enjoy gardening and cooking with the unfamiliar vegetables that they grow. They and their partner are dedicated to living more sustainably and do their best to engage in zero to low-waste living. They are also passionate about volunteer and advocacy work in houselessness and food security.

 

 

Kimberly Statham

Kimberly Statham

Project Coordinator

Kimberly grew up in British Columbia, splitting her childhood between Maple Ridge, Vernon and a farm in Salmon Arm, but has lived in Saskatoon for over 20 years. She joined the team as a clerical assistant in 2020 and transitioned to a research associate position and by late 2023, became a project coordinator. She currently leads the Bringing Our Fires Together project, which puts her extensive IT experience to use. She has years of experience in retail management of multiple companies in the city over that span of time, acquiring and developing skills and knowledge involved with marketing, logistics, training and whatever was needed. She is married and has a son. She loves playing video games and cooking.

Lorraine Seymour

Lorraine Seymour

Research Coordinator

Lorraine Seymouris the Waniska Centre’s Research Coordinator for Manitoba. She is located with our partner organization, Ka Ni Kanichihk, in Winnipeg, in Treaty 1 territory. Lorraine is a member of Anishinaabeg of Naongaashiing (Big Island) First Nation in Treaty 3 territory, south of Kenora, Ontario. Her spirit name is Waasamook (Lighnting) and she is from the Bear Clan. An Indian Residential School survivor, Lorraine used culture and language to heal and now thrives as a strong First Nations woman. She has a BA in Native Studies (as it was formerly called) from Trent University and she recently completed her Master of Social Work in Indigenous Knowledges from the University of Manitoba. Her graduate work focused on Ancestral Knowledges systems, specifically how “beading is healing.” When she isn’t working or studying, Lorraine is a passionate beadworker, language learner and a teacher of talking decolonization while leading beading is healing workshops. She is also a mother of five, grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of two.

Luke Heidebrecht

Luke Heidebrecht

Project Lead

Luke was born in British Columbia but grew up in Hepburn, SK, in Treaty 6 territory. He is of Mennonite ancestry. His role includes coordinating the Achimok and Peers 4 Wellness projects, facilitating the Sowing Seeds Together research methods workshop, and being involved in research activities such as data gathering, analysis, and knowledge translation through writing and editing. In 2022 Luke received his PhD in Curriculum Studies from USask. For this project he travelled to Guatemala and worked with Mayan communities to examine the impact of experiential education programs on hosting communities. Luke has been involved in various other research projects as an assistant, presenting and publishing, and making connections with the educational research community at the USask. He is married and has two young sons. He loves music, film and keeping active by running and going to the gym.
Lynette Epp

Lynette Epp

Research Coordinator

Lynnette oversees all the research activities for the Sanctum 1.5: Hope through Strength project grant. Lynette has a Master of Science in Community and Population Health Sciences from USask. Her thesis focused on truth and reconciliation in Indigenous health research, which gave her a different lens to understand the historical context of health research particularly. She brings over 15 years of experience in health research as a research assistant and research coordinator. She worked with Indigenous communities closely while working for the Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, where she was closely involved in the First Nations Lung Health Project. Lynette grew up in Prince Albert, in Treaty 6 territory and the Homeland of the Métis, and has lived in Saskatoon since she was in high school. She is a fourth-generation settler of Swedish and Ukrainian ancestry. She enjoys cooking, baking, reading, kayaking, camping, gardening and spending time with her family.
Melissa Morris

Melissa Morris

Waniska Community Coordinator (Manitoba)

Melissa, a Two Spirit/Indigiqueer individual, proudly holds citizenship with the Manitoba Métis Federation, tracing her ancestral roots to the Red River Settlement, northern Manitoba and Saskatchewan. She also embraces the identity of a person with lived experiences, having lived for more than a decade in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, where she faced challenges related to addiction and homelessness. Melissa has emerged as a prominent national activist within the HIV and Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections (STBBIs)  community, leveraging her strength-based narrative to address the disparities that Indigenous individuals living with STBBIs encounter. In addition to her position with Waniska,  Melissa serves as the manager of the Village Lab, a community-based research lab at the University of Manitoba. Melissa’s remarkable contributions earned her a Community Fellowship from the Feast Centre for Indigenous STBBI Research at McMaster University, a recognition closely tied to her work with Ka Ni Kanichihk. Simultaneously, she is actively working towards her Bachelor of Social Work degree in the Inner-City Social Work Program in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Manitoba. In her spare time, Melissa generously volunteers her efforts with the Nine Circles Community Health Centre, where she serves on the Board of Directors and the Lived Experiences Advisory Committee.

Michelle Paquette

Michelle Paquette

Research Associate

Michelle is a part-time research associate with the Vancouver team. She was born and rasied in the Vancouver area, but her family has ties to Treaty 6 territory near Green Lake, Saskatchewan and the Red River area of Manitoba. She is of Métis and mixed European ancestry and is on a journey to reclaim her cultural heritage. Michelle, who is a partner and mother of five children ranging in age from three to 18 years, has an Associates Degree majoring in Aboriginal Studies from Langara College and she is currently completing a BA in Interdiscipinary Studies at the University of British Columbia. She has worked on a number of health and wellness community-based research projects that address the structural inequities within the health and justice systems. She spent much of the last 10 years in the Downtown Eastside supporting community members through cultural programming and participatory action research projects. When she is not working or studying, Michelle loves creative pursuits. She sews, beads and makes drums and rattles. She also teaches these skills in the community. She also enjoys spending time in nature, either walking in the woods or on the beach, and swimming.
Nicole Pasloski

Nicole Pasloski

Research Associate

Nicole was born in Yorkton in Treaty 4 territory and raised in Treaty 6 in Saskatoon, which she still calls home. She in worked in the service industry for many years, and even opened and co-ran a restaurant for just under nine years where she cooked in a professional capacity. In 2020 she completed a BA (Honours) in Sociology at USask. She is currently completing an MA in Sociology focused on food insecurity at USask during the COVID-19 pandemic. She brings experience working with people from all walks of life in the restaurant industry and she also worked as support staff at a Community Residential Facility in cooperation with Corrections Services Canada. She has diverse research skills from her own research and from working with Dr. Allyson Stevenson in the Department of Indigenous Studies at USask. Outside of work, Nicole enjoys watching her kids participate extracurriculars, biking, golfing and camping in the summer, and curling in the winter. She also likes reading, sewing and quilting, playing with her dogs and spending time with family.

Nicole Smith

Nicole Smith

Project Lead

Nicole is Nlaka’pamux from Lytton First Nation, located in BC’s southern interior. She works on projects in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES), leading the SSLII project and supporting others including the Butterfly Project. Nicole has worked in various capacities in the DTES for about nine years. For the last three years she worked there as an Aboriginal infant development regional consultant. She also time spent working on a research study for the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use, was involved in the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS) and the AIDS Care Cohort to Evaluate Exposure to Survival Services (ACCESS) study, and worked with the WISH Drop-In Centre Society for five years as a program assistant. Nicole likes to hike when she’s not working. She’s also into print making, reading books and playing the occasional game of Mario Kart.
Nidhi Singh

Nidhi Singh

Communications Coordinator

Nidhi Singh was born and raised in northern India and immigrated to Canada in 2018 with her husband and two children. She has diverse education and experience, include master’s degrees in Commerce, Economics, and Mass Communications, and bachelor’s degrees in Education and Commerce. She has worked in communications, fund raising and education. Nidhi is active as a volunteer in several organizations including the Regina Chapter of the Canadian Public Relations Society, Hope Restored Canada, which provides support to people who have been sexually exploited and trafficked, and Reconciliation Saskatoon, where she helps bring together Indigenous and newcomer communities to better understand each other. When Nidhi is not working or volunteering, she enjoys taking long walks with her dog, writing poetry, creating abstract paintings and spending quality time with her family.

Sadeem Fayed

Sadeem Fayed

Project Lead

Sadeem is of Lebanese and Saudi Arabian ancestry. She grew up in the Middle East and England. She is a graduate student at Simon Fraser University, where she is currently pursuing a PhD in Public Health. Sadeem also holds a Bachelor of Science in Microbiology and Immunology from the University of British Columbia and an MPH from Simon Fraser University. She also has a background in biomedical research, dentistry and international trade and investment. Her work involves applying reconciliatory research methodologies to address colonial health inequities within Indigenous contexts in Canada. As a member of the team, Sadeem is co-leading the Peers4Wellness study in Vancouver, an Indigenous, community-led study which will introduce Indigenous peer-based models of Hepatitis C Virus and HIV support for Indigenous women in select regions in British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Sadeem is proud of her Middle Eastern heritage and is committed to reconciliatory citizenship at home in Canada. Sadeem lives with her husband and son in Vancouver, British Columbia, on the unceded Indigenous lands of the Coast Salish peoples.
Sarah Mohammed

Sarah Mohammed

Research Associate

Sarah is a Research Associate with the Sanctum 1.5 Hope Through Strength project. Sarah is Indo-Trinidiadian-American; she was born in New Mexico to parents of Indian descent from Trinidad. She grew up in New York and has also lived in Kuwait, Florida, Pennsylvania and briefly Italy. She now calls Treaty 6 home and lives in Saskatoon with her husband and two cats. Sarah has a BA in Psychology from Penn State and a MA in Psychology focused on Culture, Health and Human Development from USask. She has rich work experience in public policy and social returns on investment analysis. She most recently worked at the Canadian Centre for the Study of Co-operatives at USask. Outside of work, Sarah enjoys playing the piano and ukulele, going to concerts, doing embroidery and sewing, and she is an avid volunteer at a local mutual aid soup kitchen

Saydi Harlton

Saydi Harlton

Research Coordinator

Saydi works on projects with the Waniska Centre. She obtained her Masters in Community Health and Epidemiology, with a focus on Indigenous wellness, at the University of Saskatchewan in March 2020, and worked with the City of Saskatoon for six years as a supervisor in the city’s leisure centres. She was born in Treaty 4 in Moose Jaw but was raised in Treaty 6 in Saskatoon, where she lives now, with her cat Birds. She enjoys puzzles, cycling, and making homemade beer.
Sharon Jinkerson-Brass

Sharon Jinkerson-Brass

Elder and Research Associate

Sharon is a member of Key First Nation in Saskatchewan but is based in Vancouver. Sharon was part of the Sixties Scoop, in which she was removed from her family. She reunited with her family in the 1980s. Sharon is Saulteaux and received her cultural teachings from her beloved Kokum (grandmother) Rebecca, who was a midwife and traditional healer. Sharon’s cultural heritage has inspired her way of living and being, which in turn has informed her community work. As an Elder and Knowledge Holder for Pewaseskwan, Sharon has worked on multiple health related, community-based research projects. She also leads our spiritual growth with monthly Grandmother Gatherings, in which traditional teachings about the moon are shared and the team members have an opportunity to share, learn and bond. As a multi-media artist, she has contributed to several published papers and made two videos related to Indigenous health research.
Taiwo Ametepee

Taiwo Ametepee

Research Associate

Taiwo is is a Nigerian-born Ghanaian who moved to Canada to pursue a Master of Public Health degree at USask, which he completed in 2023. He is involved in the development and evaluation of Waniska’s programs, as well as the grant writing and application process. He has an educational background in medicine and surgery, which includes a degree obtained in 2010 at the University of Ilorin while in Nigeria. He worked as a team lead with an organization collaborating with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to develop health programs for and enroll Cameroonian refugees in southeastern Nigeria in the country’s national health insurance scheme. Taiwo is interested in learning more about Indigenous cultures and practices in Canada and the way colonization has affected the Indigenous population over the centuries. He is married and he and his wife had a baby girl in early 2023.

Udoka Okpalauwaekwe

Udoka Okpalauwaekwe

Casual Research Associate

Udoka is a Nigerian physician and researcher who helps with several Pewaseskwan research projects. He a medical degree from University of Nigeria, a Master of Public Health (USask) and is currently completing his PhD at USask with a focus on improving Indigenous wellness in collaboration with Indigenous communities, employing strength-based and culturally grounded strategies. In Nigeria he worked as a family physician before transitioning to a position with the federal Ministry of Health. He has rich experience in primary care, population health and wellness promotion. He uses participatory and collaborative approaches that respect self-determination. Outside of work and his studies, Udoka loves listening to and making music, especially jazz, funk, soul and Afro-pop, pursuing artistic endeavours, reading and relaxing with his family, which includes three children aged six, four and two.
Victor Foshion

Victor Foshion

Project Lead

Victor is of mixed Anishinaabe, European and North African descent. He supports the Bringing Our Fires Together project and Butterfly Project. He is interested in using arts-based therapy in research. Victor has worked with non-profits in Michigan and has also volunteered with OUTSaskatoon. He attended the University of Michigan taking arts and that is where he met his husband. Victor, a queer man from the Chicago, Ill., area, lives in Saskatoon with his husband, Josh, and their dog, Bollard.

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Most of our team lives and works on Treaty 6 territory and the Homeland of the Métis. The original peoples of these lands are the Cree, Saulteaux, Dene, Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, and Métis. Others are based in Vancouver, on the unceded lands of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) and səlilwətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples. We encourage everyone, wherever they are, to learn about the Indigenous people of the lands on which they live and work. We seek to become engaged allies together. In the spirit of truth and reconciliation, we respect the self-determination of First Nations, Métis and Inuit – in their cultures, languages and their pursuit of wellness.

© 2023 Pewaseskwan (the Indigenous Wellness Research Group) | Office of the Cameco Chair in Indigenous Health and Wellness, University of Saskatchewan.